If we all say “NO,” then NBC certainly wouldn’t dare broadcast tonight’s episode of Law & Order: SVU against our wishes, right? Right?

Jonathan Silverman plays Josh Galloway, a stand-up comedian who makes a name for himself with rape jokes and a crime for himself in alleged rapes in tonight’s episode, “Comic Perversions.” Because if you’re going to rip a plotline from the headlines, why not go completely out of context and misinterpret a blog comment thread even worse than the people blogging about this sort of thing? This scene at Comic Strip Live feels like an amateurish school play about comedy. Worse than an afterschool TV special from the late 1970s. Less believable than Weekend at Bernie’s, even.

Roll it.

That clip was labeled “Not So Funny.”

Get it?

Silverman’s character is not only accused of making so many rape jokes that he’s encouraged actual rapes, but also that he’s been one of the big bad rapists himself.

Watch the episode at your own risk. You can meet me here in the comments to talk about how we press charges for this and against whom for this crime against comedy.

UPDATE: SVU showrunner Warren Leight mocked my mockery of tonight’s episode via Twitter. The 141st character is when the real character comes out…

So here is Leight speaking with Eclipse Magazine about the episode:

I’d say, you know, this – we were aware last year there were – there’s a spate of comics getting a lot of attention for rape-jokes. And obviously there was the Tosh incident, was I think one of the more public and egregious incidents in which he decided wouldn’t it be funny if he – someone was heckling him and he got into it with her. And said wouldn’t it be funny if you were – if these guys gang raped you right here?

And, you know, at SVU we don’t think that’s funny. And then there was Dane Cook had certain jokes.

And then we’d start to – we also saw a lot of network sitcoms. It’s almost like rape-jokes became the sort of the go to. And I was a comedy writer years ago. And we used to call joke like material. If you didn’t have a joke you would reach for joke like material. And you would just try and end the sentence with the word (Kay) or something like that, you know or else – so it felt like all of a sudden a lot of sitcoms were also thinking it was really funny to make a rape-joke if they didn’t have something funny to say.

And, you know, we’ve – doing this show we deal with the real life part of rape, not the funny part.

And so we wanted to do an episode about rape culture and what we call rape comics. And is – there’s of course – there’s a giant defense to these guys. A lot of comics stood up and said you got to let people say what they want and they’re shedding light on the dark areas.

And are they or are they just going for shock or are they just being pure out. To me shock comedy or, you know, the point of good standup comedy is to take on the people in power, not to take on people who’ve been disempowered by something as horrible as rape.