In a year when the truth is more ridiculous than comedy, why not learn that a comedian could be at the center of the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election?

Randy Credico revealed this week that Congress had subpoenaed him to appear before the House Intelligence Committee on Dec. 15.

Credico spoke to NY1 about it already, and he told comedian Jimmy Dore: “I won’t talk.”

Credico, now 63, hosted a radio talk show last year for WBAI and offered frequent guest spots to Trump ally Roger Stone. “We’re on the same page on drugs,” Credico told Bedford and Bowery in the week before the 2016 Election. “We both dislike Hillary [Clinton]. We’re both fans of Julian Assange.” Credico also interviewed Assange, and is now suspected of bringing Wikileaks and Stone together, thereby encouraging the cooperation of Trump’s presidential campaign with the Russian-backed hacking of the Democratic National Committee.

So who is Credico?

Born July 5, 1954, in California, Randolph A. “Randy” Credico began his comedy career at 19 in Las Vegas, and performed a self-deprecating act that included impersonations of politicians such as Henry Kissinger and Ronald Reagan in the 1970s. He eventually earned a spot on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, but didn’t get invited over to the couch. He became more political in his act and more politically active, protesting the “Rockefeller Drug Laws” and appearing on a 1988 comedy album, “Strange Bedfellows: Comedy and Politics,” alongside Jimmy Tingle, Barry Crimmins and Will Durst.

He also has run for a variety of political offices in New York on the Democratic ticket. Credico challenged U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer in the 2010 Democratic primary, Bill de Blasio in 2013 for mayor, and Andrew Cuomo for governor in 2014 (3.6 percent of the vote in the Democratic primary).

He also provided the voice for a PufNStuf puppet who appeared on The Rosie O’Donnell Show and elsewhere in the late 1990s.

In 2003, comedian Laura Kightlinger directed a documentary about Credico, 60 Spins Around the Sun. Among the interviewees, Larry David, who said of Credico then: “He’s definitely an aberration when it comes to comedians to be so concerned about social causes. I mean, some people are concerned. You read the paper, you go, ‘Oh, that’s awful.’ But he actually does something and that’s shocking to me.”