Jordan Klepper is graduating from The Daily Show to his own late-night series on Comedy Central this fall. But first! Jordan Klepper Solves Guns!

The network is giving Klepper an hour special at 11 p.m. Sunday, June 10, 2017, to explore gun rights and legislation in his own comedy journalistic way.

“Over the course of this special, I selflessly let people on all sides of the gun debate be interviewed by me, and I was consistently surprised by how much common ground they shared,” said Klepper. “This special isn’t just about America’s relationship with guns — it’s about how needlessly toxic the debate around that issue has become. Also, doing my part to bring the country together, I show my ass on television.”

Here are the details, from Comedy Central:

Jordan Klepper Solves Guns spotlights alarming legal obstacles and enlightening personal testimony surrounding the issue of gun violence in America. The special follows Klepper as he becomes increasingly aware that legislative red tape and special interests — much more than any cultural or partisan divide — are keeping the nation from simple safety reforms.

Klepper converses with Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ), former ATF special agent David Chipman, former NRA lobbyist Richard Feldman, and more. He embeds himself with the Georgia Security Force militia and trains with former Army Special Ops soldier Pat McNamara to understand what it’s like to be “gun as f**k.” The rich, intense experiences give Klepper front-line perspective on the gun-control debate, but leave him wondering if he’s overlooked the more soft-spoken voices of ordinary citizens — the type he encounters in his hometown of Kalamazoo, Mich.

At home, Klepper interviews Midwestern moderate gun owners — among them his own cousin, Pete — gauging just how difficult it might be to change even the less adamant opinions on the other side of an issue. He even undergoes an MRI to better understand the political mind and how one might go about changing it. Weighing it all, Klepper realizes that from one side of the spectrum to the other, none of his subjects ruled out some measure of common-sense gun reform.