The Apiary talks with Ann Carr, who is branching out from her already creative short-form character work to explore herself and her career in a new one-woman show, Use It. Her advice to other performers: "Just do the work and dedicate yourself to it. Energy begets like
energy. Keep close to what engages and encourages you and stay far away
from the people, places and thoughts that disenchant and discourage
you. And don't ever be shy about asking for help. You may be better for
it and you'll never be any worse." At the UCB tonight and Jan. 29, also Feb. 12, Feb. 26.

Punchline Magazine talks with Lisa Levy, who invites comedians to lay down on her couch and act out a live therapy session in "Stand Up, Lie Down." At Ochi's Lounge (Comix downstairs), tonight with Ted Alexandro, Sara Schaefer and John Teti; next show Feb. 6. Levy tells Punchline she started the show with audience volunteers, but found much more to work with when she switched to stand-up comedians: "I also found a lot of fun stuff to work with. A lot of creative people
have emotional angst. Their reaction is to do something creative. And
there’s crying behind the laughter, and that sort of thing."

Gothamist talks with new Best Week Ever host Paul F. Tompkins. Tompkins grew up in Philadelphia, but moved to New York City for the VH1 gig after 14 years of life in Los Angeles. A big fan of the Twitter, here's how he responds to the question of BWE competing with all of the other chatter online: "In a world where everybody has the ability to comment in a public forum
(i.e. the internet) on things that are happening in the world, we’re
trying to say, 'But here’s what happens when people get paid to do it.
It’s maybe a little funnier.'" Tompkins hosts a "Best Evening Ever" live panel with the show's writers, producers and moderator John Hodgman, Jan. 27 at the 92YTribeca.