According to his wishes, George Carlin wanted to be cremated and have his ashes dispersed by his surviving family "in accordance with their knowledge of my prejudices and philosophies regarding geography and spirituality." The Keene Sentinel in New Hampshire reported today that Carlin’s older brother, Patrick, and his daughter, Kelly, first spread some of the late comedian’s ashes in front of nightclubs Carlin performed at in his early career in New York City’s Greenwich Village, then took the rest to Camp Notre Dame, an all-boys Catholic summer camp in Spofford, N.H., that Carlin attended in his youth.

“Every year that he was there, he won their drama award,” Carlin-McCall, who lives in Los Angeles, said Tuesday in a telephone interview with The Sentinel. “And one year, it was a little necklace with the comedy and tragedy masks on it. He wore that a lot. He started wearing it a lot lately, and he actually died with it on. He
had always talked to me just about how important his childhood in general was to him, and that time up in camp, which was really unusual for a kid who lived in kind of Irish Harlem. It meant a lot to him to be able to get out of the city, and also to win this award, which for him was like the first affirmation he was doing something right.”