Gothamist has a new interview with Eugene Mirman up today, and it reminds me that the cityblog’s comedy coverage just isn’t the same since parting ways recently with the young and eager Ben Kharakh (or should I say, Keith Whitener?). Not that the interview is horrible, but neither is it horribly insightful. The intro to the interview, for example, notes that Mirman will be performing in a show with Aziz Ansari, and they’ve both performed at Gothamist shows. As the author, ahem, attempts to joke: "Guess they’ll have some reminiscing to do!"

Already knew that Mirman is taking part in a funny fundraiser next week for the presidential campaign of Democratic U.S. Sen. Barack Obama. The other performers at the "Get Out The Laughs and Votes For Obama" event Jan. 29 at the Knitting Factory are Todd Barry, Aziz Ansari, Heather Lawless, Whitest Kids U’Know, Slovin and Allen, Andrea Rosen, Laura Krafft, Greg Johnson, David Rees and more, with music from Shonali Bhowmik and Marcellus Hall. Tickets, for $25, can be purchased online here.

I asked Eugene about getting politically involved, or at least indirectly involved, over on the message boards at A Special Thing.

His reply?

"I don’t think anyone will vote for Barack because I like him (though he is handsome, articulate and wise), but the event will raise money (which he can use to trick people). I think if artists who are viewed as extreme (like Michael Moore) support candidates it could maybe hurt them, but I doubt it. I don’t think I’ve ever voted for anyone because of a musician (though Aerosmith has never formally supported anyone), but I’ve certainly been made aware of issues because the news reports the opinions of actors and musicians (Bono, Phil Ochs and now Chuck Norris). There was a small backlash on Brooklyn Vegan about an Obama event that Stella and Craig Wedren are doing, which I find aggravating. You don’t have to be politically active at all (everybody finds it a little annoying), but to be mad at people for trying to participate in democracy is a lot like being an asshole. In communist countries, you are put to death for your opinions (only very terrible ones), so I like being a small part of the process. Plus I feel like I’m helping, which I of course, am not."

Eugene